Canada Needs To Welcome More Skilled Immigrants

Every year, Canada welcomes roughly 100,00 immigrants, but according to a recent report, that’s not enough to keep the country going. Conference Board of Canada latest report reveals that Canada must welcome 415,000 immigrants every year until 2030 to boost the national economy and reverse aging population. The report also added that if Canada accepts one percent more immigrants than its total population of 2030, the government will be able to overcome all challenges that seem so difficult right now. If Canada follows Conference Board of Canada’s recommendation of welcoming 415,000 immigrants annually, the population will total at 42 million by 2030.

However, the annual numbers are almost four times as much as the current intake and will require a lot of financial resources from the Canadian government, but it is a cheap price to pay for becoming a global power and taking over its neighbor, the United States. Daniel Fields and Kareem El-Assal, National Immigration Centre, Conference Board of Canada were authors of the latest report. The Canadian government announced the three years’ level plan in 2017 that aims at welcoming more than 300,000 skilled immigrants and refugees in total.

It has an annual increase of 0.95. Conference Board of Canada’s latest report is also a reflection of continuous suggestions and pleas of economists, businesspeople, and national and provincial governments to increase immigration levels so that the country can cope up with the scarcity of skilled labor and aging working population.

Helping provinces with asylum seekers

After months of discussion, the federal government finally announced that they will give Ontario, Quebec, and Manitoba $50 million for bear the influx of asylum seekers. Most of the money will go to address temporary housing needs and social services. Discussions regarding longer-term solutions including financial support will continue further. Quebec will get $35 million, Ontario will receive $11 million, and $3 million go to Manitoba.

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